What Caused This NJ Transit Bus Accident?

Photo of a personal injury claim formIn late August, we wrote about a New Jersey Transit bus accident that occurred where one bus T-boned another, injured 17 people and killing two. Now, a video has been released showing a bus driver running a stoplight that had been red for 34 seconds.

What is Driver Error?

While it’s true we’re all human and make mistakes, bus drivers can’t afford to make errors while they’re on the road. That said, all bus drivers must drive cautiously and defensively in order to avoid injuring themselves and their passengers. Unfortunately, some bus drivers fail to do so. This is called driver error. The most common types of bus driver error can include:

  • Running red lights or stop signs
  • Speeding
  • Attempting sharp turns and sudden lane changes
  • Driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol
  • Distracted driving
  • Fatigued driving
  • Continuing to drive after signs of system or equipment malfunction is apparent

While most bus drivers may feel pressured to stick to a tight schedule and rush to every stop, this is no excuse to put both their passengers and other driver’s well-being in danger on the road.

What Should I Do If I’ve Been Involved in a New Jersey Bus Accident?

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), there are approximately 300 fatal bus accidents each year in the U.S. Unfortunately, those who are injured are not always prepared for the intense defenses bus companies begin to compile immediately following a bus accident.

If you have been involved in a bus accident, your injuries can vary from some bumps and bruises to more serious injuries, such as spinal cord injuries or traumatic brain injury. In either case, it is important you contact a New Jersey personal bus accident attorney immediately to explain what your rights are moving forward.

Spevack Law Firm is a New Jersey personal injury law firm that fights for those injured in transportation accidents in the Teaneck, New Brunswick and Iselin areas.



Tags: ,