Cabinet Manufacturer Cited in Chemical Exposure Incident

Injured workerA company that designs custom cabinets faced heavy fines from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) for the way it was handling methylene chloride.

Methylene chloride is a common solvent used in industrial settings. It is also a known carcinogen, so workers who suffer repeated exposure can develop cancer, or other harmful effects on the heart, central nervous system and liver.

Choice Cabinetry LLC received numerous willful violations for refusing to implement a hazardous communication program. Workers cannot be expected to do their jobs safely without the proper training on hazard communication or the dangers of methylene chloride exposure.

One failure-to-abate violation cost the company more than $27,000. Choice Cabinetry failed to install a crucial alarm that would warn employees about inadequate ventilation, even after the company received similar citations in the past.

The cabinet company was also cited for a lack of personal protective equipment (PPE) or eyewash stations, which help prevent skin and eye irritation from exposure. By time the inspection ended, OSHA had issued more than 15 total health and safety violations.

Did Your Job Cause Your Illness?

Even brief chemical exposure can have long-term effects on a worker’s health. If you developed cancer or any other occupational illness from your job, there are laws that can help you get the treatment you deserve.

Employers often try to avoid liability for occupational illnesses, but the attorneys at Spevack Law Firm can help you develop a strong and effective legal strategy. If you have questions about your illness or injury, schedule a free consultation today.

[Did You Know: Methylene chloride, a widely used paint stripper and degreaser, is also a well-known carcinogen.]

Spevack Law Firm – Middlesex County Personal Injury Lawyers

Source: http://www.workerscompensation.com/compnewsnetwork/workers-comp-blogwire/20038-new-jersey-employer-fined-for-safety-and-health-hazards.html